do girls struggle with masturbation

do girls struggle with masturbation

For years it was girls who lagged academically. But now, boys are the ones falling through the school cracks—from kindergarten through college. Here’s why, and what we can do to help our sons.

She recognized the handwriting on the envelope, and Christine Koehler’s stomach sank. The Marietta, GA, mom of two had just gotten home from her job as an insurance adjuster and was already dreading the nightly homework ordeal with her 9-year-old son, Robert. She was not in the mood for another note from his fourth-grade teacher.

What it means is that “male” has become synonymous with “underachieving” at school: “This education gender gap is certainly not a myth, and it’s getting worse,” insists child and family psychologist John Duffy, PsyD, author of The Available Parent .

Just a few decades ago, it was girls who needed a leg up to reach the academic achievements boys attained. But the tide has turned. Female students now score higher in reading than their male counterparts at all three ages measured (9, 13 and 17), according to the National Center for Education Statistics. And recently published research from the University of Missouri–Columbia and the University of Glasgow finds that 15-year-old girls now lead the way in overall academic achievement—in math and science as well as reading—in 70 percent of countries studied.

While there’s no one reason for this academic gender shift, many experts say a great boost for American girls came in the 1960s and ’70s with the passage of Title IX. That, plus $100 million in government funding, helped level the education playing field for girls. Before this, programs in all subjects, including what we now call STEM , almost solely benefited boys. “Title IX was a critical correction,” says Dr. Duffy. By the ’90s, girls had not only caught up, they began to surge ahead in school.

The beauty industry spends billions of dollars a year convincing women that they need to look thinner, younger and sexier. Biola Magazine asked Tamara Anderson — a professor in Biola’s Rosemead School of Psychology — about the high toll the media takes on women’s body image.

Eating disorders are seen around the world in every industrialized country. But in Western culture, media has a huge influence on women’s body image, and we definitely see higher rates of eating disorders in the West. The California subculture — home to the entertainment industry and so many beaches — is particularly a problem. In California culture, men are much more concerned about how their bodies look than in other places, with what’s pushed out here as being the ideal body. But it still does not equal what women deal with.

Yes, they’re also victims of the media. I’ve worked with models whose names you’d know based on how popular they are, and they’ve had to lie in bed for 20 minutes in the morning repeating to themselves, “I am worthy to get up” because they think they’re ugly and they’re depressed and suicidal. Other people look at them and say, “Wow, they must have a good life,” but they have no idea what these women deal with everyday.

Family messages are very powerful. I’ve worked with girls who are 9 years old who exhibit eating disorder symptoms, partly because they’ve been told by their families, “You’re fat. You don’t want to be fat.” So, they start to see themselves as unworthy based on body size. If body image is elevated above other things in girls’ minds, that can create a problem.

The more refined research is showing the impact of women’s perceived body image — their ideas of what other people think of them — rather than what other people really think of them. There’s a subtle difference there, like, for instance, with a husband and wife. The husband will say, “I think you’re fine,” but if the woman’s perception is that he really doesn’t mean that, then that takes a toll on her. He can be saying until he’s blue in the face, “I don’t have any trouble with how you’re shaped and what you look like,” but her perception is what is the most powerful.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

For All Girls Who Struggle To Get Ready

The beauty industry spends billions of dollars a year convincing women that they need to look thinner, younger and sexier. Biola Magazine asked Tamara Anderson — a professor in Biola’s Rosemead School of Psychology — about the high toll the media takes on women’s body image.

Eating disorders are seen around the world in every industrialized country. But in Western culture, media has a huge influence on women’s body image, and we definitely see higher rates of eating disorders in the West. The California subculture — home to the entertainment industry and so many beaches — is particularly a problem. In California culture, men are much more concerned about how their bodies look than in other places, with what’s pushed out here as being the ideal body. But it still does not equal what women deal with.

Yes, they’re also victims of the media. I’ve worked with models whose names you’d know based on how popular they are, and they’ve had to lie in bed for 20 minutes in the morning repeating to themselves, “I am worthy to get up” because they think they’re ugly and they’re depressed and suicidal. Other people look at them and say, “Wow, they must have a good life,” but they have no idea what these women deal with everyday.

Family messages are very powerful. I’ve worked with girls who are 9 years old who exhibit eating disorder symptoms, partly because they’ve been told by their families, “You’re fat. You don’t want to be fat.” So, they start to see themselves as unworthy based on body size. If body image is elevated above other things in girls’ minds, that can create a problem.

The more refined research is showing the impact of women’s perceived body image — their ideas of what other people think of them — rather than what other people really think of them. There’s a subtle difference there, like, for instance, with a husband and wife. The husband will say, “I think you’re fine,” but if the woman’s perception is that he really doesn’t mean that, then that takes a toll on her. He can be saying until he’s blue in the face, “I don’t have any trouble with how you’re shaped and what you look like,” but her perception is what is the most powerful.

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Every Guy s Struggle | Ignite Your Faith - Christianity Today

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.