help my wife is bisexual

help my wife is bisexual

Alex Hamby has been a lot of things in life: a former comic book publisher, writer, critic who now blogs on the subjects of life and yoga. He teaches vinyasa yoga at Yoga Club DFW to some awesome and inspiring people. After years of living a lifestyle of bad food…

Alex Hamby has been a lot of things in life: a former comic book publisher, writer, critic who now blogs on the subjects of life and yoga. He teaches vinyasa yoga at Yoga Club DFW to some awesome and inspiring people. After years of living a lifestyle of bad food…

Alex Hamby has been a lot of things in life: a former comic book publisher, writer, critic who now blogs on the subjects of life and yoga. He teaches vinyasa yoga at Yoga Club DFW to some awesome and inspiring people. After years of living a lifestyle of bad food…

Alex Hamby has been a lot of things in life: a former comic book publisher, writer, critic who now blogs on the subjects of life and yoga. He teaches vinyasa yoga at Yoga Club DFW to some awesome and inspiring people. After years of living a lifestyle of bad food…

Mallory Ortberg, aka Dear Prudence, is online weekly to chat live with readers. An edited transcript of the chat is below. (Sign up below to get Dear Prudence delivered to your inbox each week. Read Prudie’s Slate columns here . Send questions to Prudence at prudence@slate.com .)

Q. Picky picky: I have an anxiety disorder called trichotillomania that makes me constantly want to pick at my skin, hair, and fingernails. I take medication and attend therapy, but I still pluck at my hair for an hour or so per night at home. The main problem is when I’m at work. If I’m stuck in a meeting, or in court, or anything particularly boring, I try to take notes or keep my hands busy, but eventually I will start picking at my cuticles, at split ends, at bumps on my arms. Nobody has ever mentioned it to me, but I know it’s unprofessional and probably gross. Should I say something to co-workers or keep picking in silence?

A: You’re doing your best to address your condition by taking medication and going to counseling, and no one at work has suggested he or she has noticed your periodic hair-twirling or nail-biting, so I don’t think you need to beat yourself up for being “gross.” If you haven’t considered awareness training/habit-reversal therapy , you might find it helpful—it involves observing the cue, routine, and reward for repetitive behavior, and changing only the routine with a “competing response.” You’re right to want to minimize your compulsive physical behavior in the workplace before it bothers your co-workers, but I hope very much you can also give yourself credit for the work you’re already doing.

A: Oh, my God. If you didn’t say anything at the time (why didn’t you say anything at the time? Did you just ... keep having sex with him?), I would file this under the category of “bizarre things that happened once” and do my best to forget it. If his relationship with his mother is otherwise normal and he was drunk, you can try to chalk it up to a weird fit of word association. If you ever accidentally called your teacher “Mom” in the second grade, you wanted the rest of the class to move on as quickly as possible. You didn’t actually think the teacher was your mother (or want her to be), but you wanted to forget about it with all possible speed. I wish hasty forgetfulness for you.

Q. Terrified of pregnancy: I’ve been in a happy marriage for five years. My husband has always said he wants a football team of kids, but I’m terrified of pregnancy. I’m not sure what it is exactly. All of it kind of grosses me out, and I’m having a really hard time trying to get excited about starting a family. He’s been ready since the wedding, but I suggested we wait a couple of years (which has turned into five), and now he’s starting to suggest we start this portion of our lives. How on earth do I get over this pregnancy phobia?

My wife is bisexual!!! please help? | Yahoo Answers

Alex Hamby has been a lot of things in life: a former comic book publisher, writer, critic who now blogs on the subjects of life and yoga. He teaches vinyasa yoga at Yoga Club DFW to some awesome and inspiring people. After years of living a lifestyle of bad food…

Alex Hamby has been a lot of things in life: a former comic book publisher, writer, critic who now blogs on the subjects of life and yoga. He teaches vinyasa yoga at Yoga Club DFW to some awesome and inspiring people. After years of living a lifestyle of bad food…

Mallory Ortberg, aka Dear Prudence, is online weekly to chat live with readers. An edited transcript of the chat is below. (Sign up below to get Dear Prudence delivered to your inbox each week. Read Prudie’s Slate columns here . Send questions to Prudence at prudence@slate.com .)

Q. Picky picky: I have an anxiety disorder called trichotillomania that makes me constantly want to pick at my skin, hair, and fingernails. I take medication and attend therapy, but I still pluck at my hair for an hour or so per night at home. The main problem is when I’m at work. If I’m stuck in a meeting, or in court, or anything particularly boring, I try to take notes or keep my hands busy, but eventually I will start picking at my cuticles, at split ends, at bumps on my arms. Nobody has ever mentioned it to me, but I know it’s unprofessional and probably gross. Should I say something to co-workers or keep picking in silence?

A: You’re doing your best to address your condition by taking medication and going to counseling, and no one at work has suggested he or she has noticed your periodic hair-twirling or nail-biting, so I don’t think you need to beat yourself up for being “gross.” If you haven’t considered awareness training/habit-reversal therapy , you might find it helpful—it involves observing the cue, routine, and reward for repetitive behavior, and changing only the routine with a “competing response.” You’re right to want to minimize your compulsive physical behavior in the workplace before it bothers your co-workers, but I hope very much you can also give yourself credit for the work you’re already doing.

A: Oh, my God. If you didn’t say anything at the time (why didn’t you say anything at the time? Did you just ... keep having sex with him?), I would file this under the category of “bizarre things that happened once” and do my best to forget it. If his relationship with his mother is otherwise normal and he was drunk, you can try to chalk it up to a weird fit of word association. If you ever accidentally called your teacher “Mom” in the second grade, you wanted the rest of the class to move on as quickly as possible. You didn’t actually think the teacher was your mother (or want her to be), but you wanted to forget about it with all possible speed. I wish hasty forgetfulness for you.

Q. Terrified of pregnancy: I’ve been in a happy marriage for five years. My husband has always said he wants a football team of kids, but I’m terrified of pregnancy. I’m not sure what it is exactly. All of it kind of grosses me out, and I’m having a really hard time trying to get excited about starting a family. He’s been ready since the wedding, but I suggested we wait a couple of years (which has turned into five), and now he’s starting to suggest we start this portion of our lives. How on earth do I get over this pregnancy phobia?

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Dear Prudence: My wife insists on telling men she’s bisexual.